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The number of England



England’s number is 9—the number of war. Hence Shakespeare was right when he said, “England, thou seat of Mars”—9 is the number of Mars.


It’s related to “666” because this is “the number of man” and also “the number of the beast”—the number of earthly rule. 6 + 6 + 6 = 18 (1 + 8 = 9). Hence England is also associated with “666” (this number is mentioned in Revelations 18 [1 + 8]—as so often happens with the Bible code, it all matches up).


Aleister Crowley called himself “the beast 666” and he was a great patriot—and was said to have invented Churchill’s “V for Victory” sign (hand symbols are occultic, there’s a whole section of them in Serrano’s Nos if you’re interested); and Crowley was also said to have undertaken various secret service activities.


“I want blasphemy, murder, rape, revolution, anything good or bad, but strong,” so said Crowley—and that’s a very “9” sentiment, a very English sentiment. It’s a number that’s about force, energy, and destruction—anything powerful (Germany has the same number, incidentally—hence the big wars between these countries).


It’s appropriate that the Industrial Revolution happened in Britain—energy, force, power (“dark Satanic mills”).


9 is the opposite to the “7”, which stands for everything spiritual and uplifting—indeed, “7” and “9” are the most important numbers for all numerological calculations (as opposites).


9 stands for matter which cannot be destroyed—because whenever you multiply any number from 1-9 with the 9 it includes itself in the result (if added together); so it’s a perennial number, whereas 7 is eternal—one is in the world, the other outside it.


9 is considered to be a fortunate number to be born under, provided you want an energetic life and you’re careful about who you make your enemy.





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