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Should you watch the NFL? I watched it in Vegas and in London (very boutique, it made me feel like a real hipster), but, as with all team sports, I found it dull. I only like to walk alone through the woods or swim—the former undertaken while I talk to myself, spontaneous intrusions from the daemon. The American right says the NFL is “sportsball”—a kind of bread and circuses distraction from real life, a corruption. Ergo, people should never watch it on political grounds—probably they will never convince that many people to think that way, since campaigns to control what you consume are a leftist domain.


It strikes me, however, that apart from baseball caps no American sport—NFL, baseball, hockey, basketball—is really popular outside America (Japan, baseball; China, basketball); and, further, when Americans play soccer it is a virtue-signal by progressives to show how “European” and cosmopolitan they are—nothing like the unsophisticated masses (a bit like my boutique American football game). The upshot from this observation is that America’s much-vaunted “soft power” really amounts to Hollywood, the pop music industry (also Hollywood), and the higher education system (Harvard). NFL does not really transfer out of country—nor do the other games, nor do many other quintessentially American activities.


It follows that no matter how many progressive advertisements are sandwiched into NFL matches the game itself is not unhealthy; even though mass spectator events have a degenerate aspect, I suspect there is something fundamentally healthy about sport. Further, Hollywood and American academia are not particularly American institutions, since the Jews have a disproportionate representation in them—they are more internationally orientated than Americans, better understand what sells across the world, and are also more left-wing than most Americans. Hence it is these products, not really representative of “America” as such, that represent America globally and tend to have a more progressive edge—yet American American things do not transfer internationally, anymore than soccer has taken over the States.

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