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(46) Schwarz



Yesterday, I arrived at Canto 18 in Dante’s Paradiso. In this section luminescent star-spheres whirl around Dante: the spheres often take on a disc-like appearance—these are the UFOs, the angels and demons. In this case, these sphere-discs were angels—Dante is in Paradise, after all. The discs proceed to spell out the following message, letter after letter, before Dante: Diligite iustitiam qui iudicatis terram. The ordinary reader may not realise it and it doesn’t seem to be known in academic discussion, but it is held that the Holy Grail is spelled out in the sky by the stars—rather as happened to me that night on Hartsfell. Hence it follows that at this point Dante has received the Grail: Diligite iustitiam qui iudicatis terram.


I was not quite sure this was so, for to pursue the Grail it is held you should use wordplay—so perhaps, so I thought, the Grail is a Latin anagram. However, I am sure that this is the Grail because last night I had a dream in which I ran down a street and said, delightedly, “I have the Grail, I have the Grail.” Then I arrived at a ’60s-style office building elevated on stilts—beneath was an electronic gate with black steel bars bookended by two large concrete trapezoid gate posts. I thought, “This is the gate of the Jews.” I looked down and repeated Diligite iustitiam qui iudicatis terram. When I looked up, the gate slid open. I noticed there was a cattlegrid on the ground before the main gate—though I then noticed there was a second pedestrian gateway to the side. I slipped through it.


To me this confirms that Diligite iustitiam qui iudicatis terram is the Grail. Indeed, it is Dante’s contention that justice is a divine name—or, in the Hindu tradition, karma (literally, “song”—from which “carmen”, poem or song in the Latin languages). Justice is a sound: “Love justice, you who judge the land.” Love the eternal sacred sound.

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